Welcome to my Inner World. I am a French self-taught artist, and these past twenty years I have made Norway my home. Moving to the Lofoten islands was the greatest present I ever made to myself and the Arctic landscapes are indeed a true treat for any artist’s eyes. I live with my British soulmate,… Continue Reading

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Author Archives: Kundry

The Interpretation of Fairy Tales by Marie Louise Von Franz

 

Book Description
Of the various types of mythological literature, fairy tales are the simplest and purest expressions of the collective unconscious and thus offer the clearest understanding of the basic patterns of the human psyche. Every people or nation has its own way of experiencing this psychic reality, and so a study of the world’s fairy tales yields a wealth of insights into the archetypal experiences of humankind. Perhaps the foremost authority on the psychological interpretation of fairy tales is Marie-Louise von Franz. In this book—originally published as An Introduction to the Interpretation of Fairy Tales —she describes the steps involved in analyzing and illustrates them with a variety of European tales, from “Beauty and the Beast” to “The Robber Bridegroom.” Dr. von Franz begins with a history of the study of fairy tales and the various theories of interpretation. By way of illustration she presents a detailed examination of a simple Grimm’s tale, “The Three Feathers,” followed by a comprehensive discussion of motifs related to Jung’s concept of the shadow, the anima, and the animus. This revised edition has been corrected and updated by the author.

About the Author
Marie-Louise von Franz (1915–1998) was the foremost student of C. G. Jung, with whom she worked closely from 1934 until his death in 1961. A founder of the C. G. Jung Institute of Zurich, she published widely on subjects including alchemy, dreams, fairy tales, personality types, and psychotherapy.

The Abhorsen Trilogy by Garth Nix

From Booklist
The mage Abhorsen is an “uncommon necromancer,” who, rather than raising the dead like others of the art, lays the dead back to rest or binds those that will not rest. Sabriel, his daughter, has been sent for her safety to boarding school outside the Old Kingdom, where she is in her last year when she receives her father’s sword and necromancy tools, which means that Abhorsen is either dead or trapped in the realm of Death. Determined to find her father, Sabriel enters the Old Kingdom, which is under attack from the minions of Kerrigor, an evil being who once was human. There, with the aid of Mogget, a Free Magic elemental who is bound in feline form to be the servant of Abhorsen, and Touchstone, a young man whose past harbors a terrible secret, Sabriel goes up against Dead spirits, Shadow Hands, gore crows, and the like, in a desperate quest to find her father’s body and fetch his spirit back from Death. Nix has created an ingenious, icy world in the throes of chaos as Kerrigor works to destroy the Charter that binds all things for the good of the land and its inhabitants. The action charges along at a gallop, imbued with an encompassing sense of looming disaster. Sabriel, who entered the Old Kingdom lacking much of the knowledge she needs, proves to be a stalwart heroine, who, in the end, finds and accepts her destiny. A page-turner for sure, this intricate tale compares favorably with Philip Pullman’s The Golden Compass and will surely appeal to the same audience. Sally Estes

In The Land of Winter by Richard Grant

 

From Library Journal
This delightful modern fairy tale blends myth and magic with intolerance and hysteria to deliver the message: don’t mess with a witch. Single mom and do-it-yourself witch Pippa Rede works in a trendy shop, lives with her disapproving great-aunt, and nurtures her beloved nine-year-old daughter, Winterbelle. When voices in the village raise cries about ritualized abuse (escalated to QROST, quasi-ritualized occultic sexual traumatization), Pippa loses first Winterbelle (to the authorities), then her job and home. With a small band of supporters?a civil libertarian lawyer, a witch friend, an elfin boy, a representative from Witches Against Negativity and Discrimination, an elderly woman, and a gentleman who goes on duty two weeks a year as a werewolf?Pippa prevails, calling on her inner resources and beliefs and emerging a stronger witch and woman than ever. Grant (Tex and Molly in the Afterlife, LJ 9/15/96) has a wonderful, witty feminist fable here, suffused with the supernatural yet grounded in morality. Highly recommended.?

The Spook’s Apprentice or The Revenge of the Witch by Joseph Delaney

 

Book Description

Capturing witches
Binding boggarts
Driving away ghosts

For years, Old Gregory has been the Spook for the county, ridding the local villages of evil. Now his time is coming to an end. But who will take over for him? Twenty-nine apprentices have tried–some floundered, some fled, some failed to stay alive.

Only Thomas Ward is left. He’s the last hope; the last apprentice.

Can Thomas succeed? Will he learn the difference between a benign witch and a malevolent one? Does the Spook’s warning against girls with pointy shoes include Alice? And what will happen if Thomas accidentally frees Mother Malkin, the most evil witch in the county … ?